General Education Courses


ENG 1101: English Reading Skills and Public Speaking

The course is designed to improve students’ Academic English skills integrating four skills of language learning- primarily focusing on reading and public speaking and additionally focusing on listening and writing skills to prepare the students entering the University for studying through the medium of English. Along with strengthening students’ reading skills, the module will enrich their vocabulary by reading a variety of adapted and authentic texts in group, pair and individual works. Students will also improve oral communication skills for academic interactions through extensive conversational practices. Oral practices include forming and communicating opinions on contemporary issues, developing formal and informal oral persuasive presentations, giving and following directions, and narrating and giving explanations. At the same time, grammatical items like subject verb agreement and tense will be highlighted sometimes by practical exercises. To supplement speaking skills, listening activities will be conducted in the classroom within group or, pair activities such as – listening for different purposes like getting specific information, completing notes, listening for main ideas and so on. Similarly, to cope with academic environment and attitudinal transformations students will engage in essential complementary writing activities and tasks such as – dialogues, paragraphs and opinions on different current issues.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Reading and Study Skills, 7e / John Langan, Mcgraw-Hill College, NY, 2013.

The Art of Public Speaking/ Stephen Lucas, McGraw-Hill Education, NY, 2015.

ENG 1202: English Writing Skills and Communication

This course aims to improve students’ academic writing skills by giving students extensive practice in inventing substantial content and expressing it using effective language. Different units in the module guide students through each stage of the process of academic essay writing:  brainstorming ideas, finding suitable sources, making notes from the sources, planning and structuring an essay, writing a draft using paraphrasing and referencing, integrating data and finally editing and proofreading using an appropriate academic style. The course will also develop students’ English language skills more generally and so help them interact more effectively in English in the wider world.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Chowdhury, Q.H., Rahman, A.R.M.M., & Kamal, M.A. (2017). English for Academic Purposes 2 Essay and Report Writing. Dhaka: University Grants Commission of Bangladesh.

BAS 1101: Bangla Language and Literature

The course will explore the socio-cultural context of Bangla through the basic tenets of its linguistic features. Texts and poems of several literary maestros   make students acquainted with Bangla’s rich literary elements in relation to Bangladeshi cultural values. In this course, students will grasp the evolution of modern Bengali language, culture, history and arts (including cinema, painting and songs as well as literature). This course will also give the students brief idea about literary periods or age divisions in the history of Bangla literature and Language.

Reference Book/ Materials:

 

BAS 1102 : Foundation of Sociology

This course provides students with the skills to analyze society from a sociological perspective. It offers a comprehensive introduction to sociology discipline and its foundation theories. It also covers the key sociological concepts in the changing contemporary society. Being the core of social science discipline, this study of Sociology helps the students attain further efficiency in understanding the psychological, social, cultural, political, anthropological and economic setup of human societies both from national and global perspective and thus, deal with the real life challenges in methodical ways.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Giddens, A. (2001) Sociology (4th ed.). Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.

Giddens, A & Duneier (2000). Introduction to Sociology. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Tischler, H. L. (1996) Introduction to Sociology. New York: The Harcourt Press.

Schaefer, R. T. (2003) Sociology (8thth ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Fletcher, R. (1981) Sociology. Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group.

Bassis, M.S., Gelles, R. J. & Levine, A.  (2002). Sociology: An Introduction. New York: McGraw-Hil.

Rao, C. N. Shankar (2007). Sociology. S. Chand & Company Ltd. New Delhi. India.

CSC 1101:  Computer Fundamentals

Course Description: This introductory course aims to develop the fundamental computer knowledge for students. It explains the computer types, its function process, its various components, and abilities. Students will perform various active tasks to demonstrate their improved knowledge and skills in computer.

Text Book:  Computer Fundamentals by P. K. Sinha

Reference Book/ Materials:  Peter Norton’s Computer Fundamentals, Fouth Edition, McGraw-Hill

BAS 1103:  Arts  and Aesthetics

The course aims to develop students’ visual, performing and aesthetic values of art in practice in various professional forms. It focuses on design and colour theories, various influential artistic movements (i.e. Impressionism), landscape painting, still life painting, portrait painting etc. Students will also learn and practice contemporary  architecture of Bangladesh.

Text Book & Course Materials :  

The Story of Cinema / Father Gasto Roberze, Calctta, India

Our Films, Their Films / Satyajit Ray, Calcutta, India

My Autobiography / Charles Chaplin, USA

Ray’s world / Multimedia, Calcutta, India

Essential Modern Art / Robin Blake, London, UK

The Arts / Marshall Cavendish, London & New York

Zainul Abedin / Shilpokala Academy, Dhaka

Sangeet Kosh/ Karunamoy Goshswami, Dhaka

Tagore the Myriad-Minded Man / Krishna Dutta & Andrew Robinson, UK

Sherebanglanagar Louis Kahn & making of a capital complex / Kazi Khaled                                      Ashraf Ul Haque & Saif Ul Haque / Dhaka

BAS 1205: History of Emergence of Bangladesh

This course will present a general overview of political events, organizations and issues that contributed to the birth of Bangladesh and post-independence developments till today.  This course will focus on peasant resistance, marginalized peoples, ethnic and caste issues, women and culture, Iconic historic moments, such as the 1857 movement, how the first partition of Bengal in 1905 and its multiple nationalist implications; Hindu-Muslim conflict; partition of Bengal in 1947; the 1952 Language Movement, Pakistan experiences, as a background to the war of 1971; democracy, authoritarianism and militarism in post-independent Bangladesh.

 

MAT 2102: Statistics for Social Science

The course will develop students’ understanding for statistics for general social science focusing on frequency distribution, charts and graphs, central tendency measures, measures of dispersion, simple correlation and regression, probability, sampling & distribution, estimation theory, contingency table and test of hypothesis.  It also focuses on real data applications, quantitative literacy, statistical thinking and the use of statistical software. The course will prepare the students well prepared to perform professional statistical work.

Textbook/ Reference:

Blalock, Hubert M. ,1979, Social Statistics, 2d ed., McGraw-hill.

Runyon, R P. & Haber, A. 1990, Fundamentals of Social Statistics,2d ed., McGraw-hill.

Lind A. et al., 2005, Statistical  Techniques in Business and Economics, McGraw-Hill.

Gupta & Gupta, 2006,  Business Statistic, Sultan Chand and Sons, India.

K. de, “Environmental Chemistry”, 5th ed, 2003, New Age Int’l Publishers, New Delhi

 

BAS 2105 Fundamentals of Economics

Upon completion of this course students should be able to understand the importance of economics in everyday business decision-making, differentiate between microeconomics and macroeconomics and its implications for business organizations. Students will also understand fundamental economic principles, appreciate supply and demand analysis in market systems, understand short and long term cost curves, explain price and output decisions of a firm in various markets, learn economic reasons for regulations and build an awareness of related current issues, the aggregate performance of the economy with a focus on the determination of particular variables such as national income, the rate of unemployment, the rate of inflation, and the level of interest rates. Government fiscal and monetary policies and other relevant topics will be discussed in the light of day-to-day business decision-making process.

Textbook / Reference Materials:

Mankiw, Gregory, 2003, Principles of Economics, 7th Edition

Samuelson and Nordhaus, Economics, 18th Edition.

R. McConnel & S. L. Brue, Macroeconomic, 17th Ed, McGraw-Hill.

 

BAS 2206: Natural Science

The course aims to develop understanding for basic sciences and its natural phenomena, contributing to the functions of modern life and is important in all respects of our society. It will also focus on fundamental concepts of each area of natural sciences. Students are expected to perform effectively in a scientific environment and at the relevant workplace.

Textbook/ Reference Materials:

Abbott, A. F .“Physics”, 5th ed, 2002, Heinemann Educational.

Holderness & Lambert, “A New Certificate Chemistry”, 1987, 6th ed, Heinemann Educational.

Sandra S. Gottfried, “Biology Today”, Mosby.

Eidon D. Enger, Andrew H. Gibson, J. Richard Kormelink, Frederick C. Ross and Rodney J. Smith, “Concept in Biology”, 5th ed, 1988, Wm. C. Brown Publishers, Dubuque, lowa

K. de, “Environmental Chemistry”, 5th ed, 2003, New Age Int’l Publishers, New Delhi

 

BAS 2207: Social Science Research Methodology

This course aims to develop students research skills for social science research work and implement the results at workplace. Qualitative and quantitative research, research tools, & techniques are the main focus of the course. Besides, research design, problem formulation, data collection, instrument development and application are also included in the course.

Textbook/Reference Materials:

  1. Mouton and H. C. Marais, Basic Concepts in the Methodology of the Social Sciences, CRC Press, 1990.

Rt Kumar, Research Methodology: A Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners, SAGE pub., 2010

 

BBA 3103: Elementary Accounting

The course will develop students’ active knowledge and skills of accounting such as definition, information, concepts and principles, equation, measuring and recording of business transactions, adjusting entries, and completing the accounting cycle. It will also orient the students with classified financial statements, depreciation, inventories, managerial accounting basics, cost behavior, cost volume-profit and its analysis and budgeting. Finally, it will prepare them to do professional accounting.

Textbook/Reference Materials:

“Principles of Accounting”, Jerry J. Weygandt, Doland E. Keiso, Paul de Kimmel; 9th Edition; Wiley & Sons, Inc.

“Managerial Accounting”, Ray H. Garrison, Eric W. Noreen & Peter C. Brewer, Twelfth edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin.

“Fundamental of Accounting Principles”, K.D. Larson & P.D. Miller, Sixth Edition, Irwin

 

 



Core Courses: Literature


ENG 1203: English Literature and Stylistics

Course Description: English Literature and Stylistics is designed to provide a foundation for students to be able to read, analyze and appreciate prose, poetry, and drama in English. This course aims to address many humanistic concerns about the nature of literature as well as the practice of literary criticism. By close reading texts, some of the compelling reasons for reading and studying literature will be explored. The course also aims at equipping students with the stylistic features of different literary genres. Students will also watch, listen and perform in different literary displays through art, film, music, and stage to develop comparative analysis skills.

Text and Reference Book/ Materials:

Booth, Alison & Mays, Kelly J. (2010) The Norton Introduction to Literature: Shorter Tenth Edition. New York: W. W. Norton.

Abrams, M. H. (1929). A Glossary of Literary Terms (8th ed.). UK: S S Publications.

Orwell, G. (1946). Animal Farm. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company.

Shaw, B. (2006). Arms and the Man: an Anti-Romantic Comedy in Three Acts. Penguin Classics

Other necessary texts/materials will be provided by the course teacher

 

ENG 2107: Introduction to English Poetry

Course Description: This course is aimed at strengthening students’ advanced understanding of English poetry. This understanding process will range from identifying the figures of speech to valuing poetry either individually or comparatively. By the end of the course, the students are expected to critically reflect on any poem by using their knowledge and skills of reading, analyzing, and contextualizing the form and content of poetry.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Booth, Alison & Mays, Kelly J. (2010) The Norton Introduction to Literature: Shorter Tenth Edition. New York: W. W. Norton.

Wainwright, J. (2016) Poetry: The Basics. 3rd Edition. London and New York: Routledge.

Hamilton, E. I., & illustrated by Steele Savage. (1942). Mythology: Timeless tales of Gods and heroes. New York: Penguin Books.

Abrams, M. H. (1929). A Glossary of Literary Terms (8th ed.). UK: S S Publications.

Other necessary texts/materials will be provided by the course teacher

 

ENG 3213: Appreciation of Drama

Course Description: The course is aimed at strengthening students’ understanding of the basics of drama. This will give them an idea about drama, its elements, types and literary terms related to drama. Then they will read three classic plays by three world famous playwrights. These plays have been chosen carefully so that the students can get introduced to three basic types of plays, tragedy, comedy and tragi-comedy.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Booth, Alison & Mays, Kelly J. (2010). The Norton Introduction to Literature: Shorter Tenth Edition. New York: W. W. Norton.

Hamilton, E. 1., & illustrated by Steele Savage. (1942). Mythology: Timeless tales of Gods and heroes. New York: Penguin Books.

Abrams, M. H. (1929). A Glossary of Literary Terms (8th ed.). UK: S S Publications.

Other necessary texts/materials will be provided by the course teacher

 

ENG 2210: English Prose and Fiction

Course Description: The course introduces students to English Prose in detail with examples from Fiction and Non-fiction sub-genres. Students will get exposure to different narrative techniques and observe the changes in style, and expression of different authors. Students will examine the texts for figures of speech, structural pattern, use of theme and focus.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Booth, Alison & Mays, Kelly J. (2010) The Norton Introduction to Literature: Shorter Tenth Edition. New York: W. W. Norton.

Robert Diyanni Literature, McGraw Hill

Kennedy X. J. An Introduction to Literature, Harper Collins College Publishers

Abrams, M. H. (1929). A Glossary of Literary Terms (8th ed.). UK: S S Publications.

Other necessary texts/materials will be provided by the course teacher

 

ENG 2208: Classical Literature

Course Description: The course covers five important works of five well known authors of the Classical Period.  The texts will be fully discussed and analyzed along with the reference to other great writers of that period. The influence of Greek literature on the other periods of English literature will be highlighted also. Some basic concepts and literary terms necessary to understand classical literature will be the part of syllabus also.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Booth, Alison & Mays, Kelly J. (2010) The Norton Introduction to Literature: Shorter Tenth Edition. New York: W. W. Norton.

Robert Diyanni Literature, McGraw Hill

Kennedy X. J. An Introduction to Literature, Harper Collins College Publishers

Abrams, M. H. (1929). A Glossary of Literary Terms (8th ed.). UK: S S Publications.

Other necessary texts/materials will be provided by the course teacher

 

ENG 4214: Contemporary South Asian Writings in English

Course Description: This course aims at giving students an overview of South Asian literature in English and introducing them to the formal and linguistic issues that underpin these writings. This course will also increase their understanding of contemporary South Asian culture and its interface with the western culture. A range of fictional writings in English from South Asia will be covered to appreciate the culture-specific interpretation required in close reading of postcolonial literatures.  Emphasis will also be on the distinctive features of South Asian Writings, aspects of South Asian diasporic experience, multiculturalism, problems of colonialism, post-colonialism, gender, race etc.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Brians, P. (2003). Modern South Asian literature in English. Westport: Conn.

Indian English Novels by Priamvada Gopal

Ghosh, A. (2011). The shadow lines. London: John Murray.

Haq, K. (2007). Published in the Streets of Dhaka: Collected Poems 1966-2006. Dhaka: writers.ink.

Lahiri, J. (2000). Interpreter of maladies. London: Flamingo.

Narayan, R. (2006). The guide. New York: Penguin Books.

Parthasarathy, R. (1984). Ten twentieth-century Indian poets. Delhi [etc.]: Oxford University Press.

 


 

 Core Courses: Linguistics and TEFL


ENG 1204: Introduction to Linguistics

Course Description: This course aims to introduce students to the nature of language and some fundamental concepts of linguistics. It enables students to discover language data and acquaints them with the major areas of linguistics and techniques of linguistic analysis with special reference to English. It also helps students to develop the skills of logical thinking and deduction, which are both essential for other areas of study.

 Text Books:

Brinton, L. J. & Brinton, D. M. (2010). The Linguistic Structure of Modern English. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Fromkin, V., Rodman, R., & Hyams, N. M. (2014). An Introduction to Language. Boston, MA: Thomson Wadsworth.

 

 

ENG 2105: Writing for Arts & Social Sciences

Course Description: This course enables students to develop effective academic, creative and journalistic writing skills or strategies pertaining to their Arts and Social Sciences discipline and enrich their critical thinking and analytical abilities by reading and reacting to a variety of adapted and authentic texts.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Fabb, N. & Durant, A. (2005). How to Write essays and Dissertations (2nd Edition). Harlow: Pearson Education Limited.

Langan, J. (2012). Exploring Writing: Sentences and Paragraphs (3rd Edition). McGraw-Hill Higher Education.

Langan, J. (2012). Exploring Writing: Paragraphs and Essays (3rd Edition). McGraw-Hill Higher Education.

Stephens, M. (1992). Practise Advanced writing. Essex: Longman.

 

 

ENG 2106: Phonetics and Phonology

Course Description: The course enables students to develop a basic understanding of the phonological organization of English including consonants, vowels, the syllable, word stress, and intonation. This course also aims to raise learners’ awareness of how pronunciation contributes to communication applying their knowledge of phonetics and phonology.

 Text Book:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology: A practical Course (4th Edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

ENG 2209: History of English Language

Course Description: The course serves as a broad introduction to the history of English language. It will enable students to get a clear understanding and appreciation of the major events responsible for the birth and development of English through ages.

Reference Books/ Materials:

Baugh, A. C. and Cable, T. (2002). A History of the English Language (6th Edition). Oxon: Routledge.

Barber, C. The English Language: A Historical Introduction.

Crystal, D. (2003). The Cambridge Encyclopedia of English Language (2nd Edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

ENG 3111: Professional English

Course Description: This course enables students to develop effective communication skills or strategies by providing them with opportunities to get practice in a variety of non- verbal, oral and written communication situations in English related to multi- faced professional purposes including business/ official correspondence, presentation skills, resume writing, job interview skills,  film or book review writing and media communication.

Text Books:

Taylor, S. (2005). Communications for Business: A Practical Approach (4th Edition). Harlow: Longman.

Downes, C. (2008). Cambridge English for Job Hunting. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

English, L. M. and Lynn, S. (1995). Business Across Cultures: Effective Communication Strategies. Harlow: Longman.

 

 

ENG 3112: English Language Teaching Techniques

Course Description: The course serves as an introduction to theories and principles of English language teaching, language acquisition, and a review of the various methods and approaches used in language teaching—leading to an understanding of the development of the communicative approach. This course will provide opportunities for peer teaching which will enable them to become skilled teachers in diverse situations. Classes will be interactive, and students have to take part in discussion. They will need to study the concerned texts thoroughly and consult reference books.

Text Book:

Larsen-Freeman, D. and Anderson, M. (2011). Techniques and Principles in Language Teaching (3rd Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Richards, J. C. and Rodgers, T. S. (1999). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching (2nd Edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

ENG 4103: Teaching Grammar and Vocabulary

Course Description: This course enables students to develop competencies for teaching grammar in a focused and contextualized manner in school in Bangladesh. Students will get opportunity to try out teaching strategies in micro‐teaching sessions. The course also helps students to identify the types of grammatical problems that Bangladeshi learners tend to have and further develop their own grammatical competence and awareness.

 Text Books:

Nassaji, H. & Fotos, S. (2011). Teaching Grammar in Second Language Classrooms. NY: Routledge.

Thornbury, S. (2005). How to Teach Grammar. Harlow, England: Longman.

Celce-Murcia, M. & Hilles, S. (1988). Techniques and Resources in Teaching Grammar. USA: Oxford University Press.

Chapelle, C. A., Ed. (2013). The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

 

 

ENG 4209: Psycholinguistics

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the study of the relationship between language and the processes of the human mind/brain. It covers areas such as speech perception, word recognition, lexical ambiguity, sentence comprehension, sentence production, language acquisition, and neurolinguistics.  Emphasis will be given on how language behavior illuminates our understanding of the mind and the brain, and how properties of the mind and brain influence human language.  Students would also learn something about the nature of language, how it is used, how our language skills develop among human children, and how they can be impaired. Its main goal is to develop an understanding of the different stages of language acquisition, the critical period and other basic issues.

Text Book:

Clark, E. V. (2016). First Language Acquisition (3rd Edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Steinberg, D. D. and Sciarini, N. V. (2006). An Introduction to Psycholinguistics (2nd Edition). Harlow: Longman.

 

 

ENG 3214: Sociolinguistics

Course Description: This course is designed to highlight the fundamental notions of the relationship between language and society, as well as explore the ways language is used in society, the world of multilingualism and global English. The aim of this course is to introduce participants to concepts and issues in sociolinguistics which are relevant to their lives as prospective or practicing language teachers. The course also aims at sociolinguistic perspective of language teaching, which includes the examination of what happens in the classroom with teachers and learners, and also how these practices relate to the broader socio-political context in which the teaching and learning takes place.

Text Book:

Wardhaugh, R. (1998). An Introduction to Sociolinguistics (7th Edition). Oxford: Blackwell.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Trudgill, P. (2000). Sociolinguistics: An Introduction to Language and Society. London: Penguin.


 

Literature Major Courses


ENG 4111: Middle English Literature

Course Description: The course aims to introduce students to these issues of the Middle Ages through studying parts of three prominent texts of the time. Moreover students are supposed to have an understanding of the range and variety of the literature and dialects during the Middle English period. In order to understand these remote texts properly, the lectures will deal with a number of important aspects of the cultural history of the Middle Ages, including social structure, church and clergy, ideas about nature, love, sex and marriage, dress and food, life and death, the production of manuscripts, and the tension between ideal and reality.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Booth, Alison & Mays, Kelly J. (2010). The Norton Introduction to Literature: Shorter Tenth Edition. New York: W. W. Norton.

Hamilton, E. 1., & illustrated by Steele Savage. (1942). Mythology: Timeless tales of Gods and heroes. New York: Penguin Books.

Abrams, M. H. (1929). A Glossary of Literary Terms (8th ed.). UK: S S Publications.

Other necessary texts/materials will be provided by the course teacher

 

ENG 4112: Romantic Poetry

Course Description: This course is primarily an introduction to the great poetry of the Romantic period in Britain (1789‐1832), with a particular focus on the poetry of William Blake, William Wordsworth, S. T. Coleridge, Byron, P. B. Shelley, and John Keats. Main themes include the poets’ interest in the Self and its various interactions with society and nature, the human mind, and the transformative power of the imagination. The course will emphasize close reading, but it will also draw attention to the relationship between text and context, poetry and poet, poetic creation and critical value.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Greenblatt, Stephen, gen. ed. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 9th ed. Vol. 2. New York: Norton, 2012. Print.

Bowra, C. M. 1. (1961). The romantic imagination / C.M. Bowra. New York: Oxford University Press.

Bloom, H. (1971). The Visionary Company (2nd ed.). Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press.

Hamilton, E. 1., & illustrated by Steele Savage. (1942). Mythology: Timeless tales of Gods and heroes. New York: Penguin Books.

Abrams, M. H. (1929). A Glossary of Literary Terms (8th ed.). UK: S S Publications.

Other necessary texts/materials will be provided by the course teacher

 

ENG 4113: Victorian Literature

Course Description: In this course, students will be familiarized with a diverse body of Victorian literature, the cultural and political context within which it was produced and major present-day critical issues relevant to it. Readings will cover the canonical works.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, volume 2, (PDF)

Wilde, O. (1899). The Importance of Being Earnest. New York, Dover Publications, Inc.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Walker, H. (1921). The Literature of Victorian Era, Cambridge University Press.

 

ENG 4114: 19th Century Literature (Novel)

Course Description: This course analyzes few novels of 19th century, the period in which the genre excelled.  Issues such as industrialization, class, science vs. religion, female identity in fiction and authorship, utilitarianism and its effect on society and human relationships will be examined through close reading of some literary canons of the period.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Ford, B. (Ed.). (1983). From Dickens to Hardy (Vol. 6, Guide to English Lit.). Pelican Books.

Abrams, M. H. (1929). A Glossary of Literary Terms (8th ed.). UK: S S Publications.

Dickens, C. (1861). Great Expections. Chapman and Hall.

Austen, J. (1813). Pride and Prejudice. Thomas Egerton.

Bronte, E. (1847).Wuthering Heights. Thomas Cautley Newby.

Bronte, C. (1847). Jane Eyre. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

Other necessary texts/materials will be provided by the course teacher

 

ENG 4115: Modern Fiction

Course Description: In this course, emphasis will be on writers and their works to show how they are different from their predecessors in the respect of their treatment of theme, structure and other literary aspects. This course will cover the seminal features of modernism, namely, angst of individuality, stream of consciousness, alienation, symbolism, existential crisis and intertextuality. This course will examine representative works by the following authors:

 Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Earnest Hemingway: Old Man and the Sea

H. Lawrence: ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’

Virginia Woolf: ‘The Mark on the Wall’

James Joyce: ‘Eveline’, ‘Araby’

John Michael Coetzee: Waiting for the Barbarians /Disgrace

D. Salinger: The Catcher In The Rye

 

ENG 4211: Modern Drama and Poetry

Course Description: This course will include some major modern dramatists and their works to highlight constituent elements like plot, characterization, language, setting, movement, theme, etc. This course will also cover the body of modern poetry, its characteristic techniques, concerns, and major practitioners.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Brecht, B. (1982). Mother Courage. Sydney: Metropolitan West.

Beckett, S. (2004). Waiting for Godot. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, 3rd Edition: Volume 1, Modern Poetry. (2003). London:

All kinds of lecture sheets and materials given by the course teacher

 

ENG 4212 American Literature

Course Description: This course is designed to cover some of the major American authors and some representative literary pieces to give students a brief idea about the mainstream American literature with particular focus on the Idea of democracy, American dream, Capitalism, Business, Consumerism, Transience of life, Individualism, Confessional poetry, Concept of Beauty, Black and White Dichotomy etc.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

Songs of Myself, Walt Whitman

Death of a Salesman, Arthur Millar.

The Norton Anthology of American Literature , Eighth Edition

The Cambridge Introduction to Twentieth-Century American Poetry   Christopher Beach 2003 University Press Cambridge

A Brief History of American Literature by Richard Gary (2010)

 

ENG 4213: Shakespeare

Course Description: This course is based on the consideration of the development of Shakespeare’s dramatic genius through a study of selected comedies, tragedies, and chronicles. The course will provide students with the tools to understand and analyze Shakespeare’s language as well as to discuss larger themes in Shakespeare’s regarding timeless issues like love, jealousy, greed and death and how they can inform contemporary life.   Emphasis will be placed on close, careful, and critical readings and analyses of the texts.  The course will introduce students to this great writer and will help them cultivate an appreciation of Shakespearean drama through a careful examination of representative plays. They will examine the growth and development of Shakespeare’s abilities as a dramatic author and man of his age through a study of the pertinent historical background.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

The Sonnets, Hamlet, Henry IV, The Tempest                                                                    All lecture sheets and materials given by the course teacher

 

 

ENG 4215: African Writings in English

Course Description: This course is designed to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of African literature in English with reference to prominent writings from different parts of Africa.  The focus will be to bring out the salient features of African literature that have given it a distinct identity. This course invites students to reflect on how literary production from Africa simultaneously embodies and creates culture through an interdisciplinary structure that blends history, politics, sociology and linguistics.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

“The African Writers and the English Language” by Chinua Achebe

A History of Twentieth Century African Literature edited by Oyekan Owomoyela

Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin. The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-colonial Literature. London: Routledge, 1989.

Boehmer, Elleke. Colonial and Postcolonial Literature: Migrant Metaphors. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005.

 

 

 ENG 4216: 16th and 17th Century English Literature

Course Description: The course aims at providing a broad sample of 17th century English literature through a wide range of literary genres, including poetry, epic and play. The objective of the course is to familiarize the student with the development of different genre of English literature of the century. Students will familiarize themselves with remarkable authors of the periods that fall within these two centuries and the styles and genres associated with those. These genres and styles ranging from epic to metaphysical, to mock epic, and to early romantic poems are representative of the eras like Puritan, Neo Classical, and early Romantic age. They will also apply literary criticism and critical approaches to the reading of the texts in order to elicit a critical understanding of poems by poets like Milton, Spenser, Herrick, Kyd, Donne, Marvel. The course also discusses the socio-political context in order to reveal the continuous commotion in religion, science, sentiment, domestic relationships, culture and so on. Thus this will create the scope for students to discover different perceptions of the period.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Required Texts:

Spenser, Edmund, Thomas P. Roche, and C P. O’Donnell. Edmund Spenser, the Faerie Queene. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1981. Print.

Kyd, Thomas, and David M. Bevington. The Spanish Tragedy. Manchester: Manchester Univ. Press, 1996. Print.

Milton, John, and John Leonard. Paradise Lost. London: Penguin Books, 2003. Print.

Muscatine, Charles. Medieval Literature, Style, and Culture: Essays. Columbia (Miss.: University of South Carolina Press, 1999. Print.

Clements, Arthur L. Poetry of Contemplation: John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, and the Modern Period. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1990. Print.

Recommended Reading:

Lewis, C S. The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature. Cambridge University Press, 1994. Print.

Guibbory, Achsah, ed. The Cambridge Companion to John Donne. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2006. Print.

“The Cambridge Companion To Paradise Lost.” The Cambridge Companion to Paradise Lost. Ed. Louis Schwartz. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2014. I-Ii. Print.

Burlinson, Christopher. Allegory, Space and the Material World in the Writings of Edmund Spenser (studies in Renaissance Literature, Vol. 17). Boydell and Brewer Limited, 2006.

“Vengeance Is Yours: Reclaiming the Social Bond in The Spanish Tragedy and Titus Andronicus,” Atlantis 29, no. 2 (December 2007).p.59–74.

 

 

ENG 4217: The Restoration Period

Course Description: Eighteenth century English literature experienced and accommodated various emerging form of writings. The writers of this literary era produced well-received early novels, critical and political essays, satiric and allegorical pieces, travelogues, autobiographies and memoirs. This course aims to introduce the students with the experimental, diversified yet reflective works by the prominent authors through their representative pieces. It is diversely designed with poetry, drama and novels. Starting with John Dryden, the texts for this course include names like Gulliver’s Travels, The way of the World and The Rape of the Lock. The students are expected to understand the significance and singularity of the literary era through the study and discussion of the texts. The course is designed to cover restoration era’s progress in fiction, drama and poetry, with an objective to show the scientific, philosophical and rational spirit of the enlightenment in Europe. These genres will offer a clear insight into the historical, cultural, religious, political and philosophical views of the period. The students will also learn about and critically examine the conventions of the then contemporary English and French society through the satirical representations of Swift, Dryden, Pope, and Congreve.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Required Texts:         

Willey, Basil. The Seventeenth Century Background: Studies in the Thought of the Age in Relation to Poetry and Religion. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1979. Print.

Willey, Basil. The Eighteenth Century Background: Studies on the Idea of Nature in the Thought of the Period. New York: Columbia University Press, 1950. Print.

Swift, Jonathan. Gulliver’s Travels. New York: Knopf, 1991. Print.

Pope, Alexander, and C T. Thomas. The Rape of the Lock: An Heroi-Comical Poem. London: Sangam Books, 1989. Print.

Congreve, William. The Way of the World. London: Hern, 2001. Print.

 

Recommended Reading:

Watt, Ian. The Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding, 2015. Print.

Richetti, John, ed. The Cambridge Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1996. Print.

Bloom, Harold. Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels. New York: Bloom’s Literary Criticism, 2009. Print.

Harth, Phillip. “The Problem of Political Allegory in ‘Gulliver’s Travels.’” Modern Philology, vol. 73, no. 4, 1976, pp. S40–S47. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/436832.

Bentman, Raymond. “Satiric Structure and Tone in the Conclusion of Gulliver’s Travels.” Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, vol. 11, no. 3, 1971, pp. 535–548. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/449912.

Cohen, Ralph. “The Reversal of Gender in ‘The Rape of the Lock.’” South Atlantic Bulletin, vol. 37, no. 4, 1972, pp. 54–60. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3197366.

Wasserman, Earl R. “The Limits of Allusion in ‘The Rape of the Lock.’” The Journal of English and Germanic Philology, vol. 65, no. 3, 1966, pp. 425–444. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/27714890.

Richard W. F. Kroll. “Discourse and Power in the Way of the World.” ELH, vol. 53, no. 4, 1986, pp. 727–758. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2873172.

Hinnant, Charles H. “Wit, Propriety, and Style in The Way of the World.” Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, vol. 17, no. 3, 1977, pp. 373–386. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/450072.

Lyons, Charles R. “Disguise, Identity, and Personal Value in ‘The Way of the World.’” Educational Theatre Journal, vol. 23, no. 3, 1971, pp. 258–268. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3205354.

 

Recommended Watching:

Danson, Ted, Mary Steenburgen, James Fox, Charles Sturridge, Simon Moore, and Jonathan Swift. Gulliver’s Travels. , 1999. Film.

 

ENG 3213: Translation Studies

Course Description: This course aims to offer an introduction to the theory and practice of translation. It will survey some of the significant developments in the rise of the translation studies as a discipline. The main focus of the course is on applying some of the insights gained from translation studies in order to translate texts from English to Bangla and vice versa. Indeed, students will be required to translate short poetry, prose, and short fiction as well as non-literary texts.

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Translation Studies by Susan Bassnett

“The Task of the Translator” by Walter Benjamin

“Principles of Correspondence” by Eugene Nida

Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications by Jeremy Munday

 

 

ENG 4219: Literary Theory

Course Description: This course aims to offer an introduction to the theories and critical premises of literary theories that were developed in the twentieth century and onwards. The course will elaborate on some of the significant developments in the rise of the critical studies as a discipline. The main focus of the course is to appreciate, analyze and apply the critical terminologies and theories into already studied literary texts. Students will be required to develop understanding of theories and should be able to interpret literary texts by using these theories as tools.

 

Text and Reference Books/ Materials:

Tyson, Lois. Critical Theory Today: A User Friendly Guide (Second Edition). Routledge, 2002

Barry, Peter Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory (4th edition). Manchester University Press 2017

Guerin, L. Guerin. A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature (Fifth Edition), Oxford University Press, 2007.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Linguistics and TEFL Major Courses


 

ENG 4101: Morphology

Course Description: This course offers a general introduction to English morphology with a view to helping students understand the morphological process of word formation. This course emphasizes on the major morphological processes including inflection, derivation, compounding, affixation, etc. that are commonly found in English. Students will learn about English words and practice morphological analysis on different data sets.

 Text Book:

Carstairs-Mcurthy, C. (2002). An Introduction to English Morphology: Words and their Structure. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Plag, I. (2003). Word formation in English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

ENG 4102: Syntax and Semantics

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of syntax – the grammatical structure (phrase/sentence structure) of language. The major topics include classification of words into syntactic categories, and how words can be combined into phrases and phrases into sentences and the function of words and phrases in the sentence as well as different verb complementation types. The course focusses on the basic concepts and methods of syntactic analysis and description, and the practical analysis and description of a range of phenomena from English.

Text Book:

Miller, Jim. 2008. An Introduction to English Syntax. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press Ltd.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Gelderen, Elly van. 2010. An introduction to the grammar of English. Amsterdam / Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

 

 

ENG 4104: Pragmatics and Discourse Analysis

Course Description: This course is an introduction to core issues in Pragmatics and Discourse: the study of contextual aspects of linguistic meaning, language in use. This course investigates the structure of communication from a linguistic perspective using a range of resources and techniques for analyzing texts, and enables students to apply them in looking at use of language as one aspect of social processes in society.

 Textbooks:

Cutting, J. (2008). Pragmatics and Discourse (3rd Edition). Routledge: London.

McCarthy, M. (2002). Discourse Analysis for Language Teachers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Brown, G. and Yule, G. (1983). Discourse Analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

ENG 4105: World Englishes

Course Description:The course provides students with a socio-political, historical background of the emergence of Global Englishes and the increasing use of English as a world language. The course also explores sociolinguistic concepts of pidgins and creoles, language contact, convergence, divergence, nativisation focusing on English-based varieties and reflects on current issues and debates surrounding (non-)standard varieties, native speaker, the teaching of English, etc.

 Text Book:

Jenkins, J. (2009). Global Englishes: A resource book for students (3rd Edition). London: Routledge.

Schneider, E. W. (2007). Postcolonial English: Varieties around the world. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

ENG 4201: Second Language Acquisition

Course Description: The course mainly provides an introduction to various theoretical aspects of psychology and Second Language Acquisition (SLA) with a view to help students to understand the teaching and learning process better. Focus will be on a number of aspects: major theories of language learning, recent advances in educational psychology and individual differences in learning both in children and adults. In addition, this course will also place some emphasis on more recent sociocultural and sociolinguistic perspectives on additional language learning exploring language learning processes, products and outcomes in a variety of contexts from around the world. To develop an understanding of the principles and processes that govern second language learning and use.  SLA will be examined from three aspects:

i) As linguistics knowledge

ii) As a cognitive skill

iii)        As a social and personality-mediated process

 

Text Book:

Ortega, L. (2009). Understanding Second Language Acquisition. NY: Routledge.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Ellis, R. (1994). The study of second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Ellis, R. (1986). Understanding second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

ENG 4202: Language Testing

Course Description:

This course is a practical introduction to the basics of language testing, with particular reference to classroom testing. The course includes items like: principles of good test design, different ways of testing grammar, vocabulary, listening, reading, speaking and writing, and their suitability for different learners.

 

Text Books:

McNamara, T. (2000). Language Testing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bachman, L. F. (1990). Fundamental Consideration in Language Testing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bachman, L. F. and Palmer, A. S. (1996). Language Testing in Practice: Designing and Developing Useful Language Tests. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hughes, A. (2003). Testing for Language Teachers (2nd Edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

ENG 4203: Syllabus and Material Design

Course Description:

This course aims to provide students with a general understanding of the major approaches, theories, and issues of language curriculum and materials evaluation. This course will provide the ideas of the relationship between curriculum and syllabus, models of syllabus and courses, the role and purpose of assessment within the curriculum, syllabuses and courses, and the potential relationship of assessment to syllabus change. This course will also serve a better idea of the role of materials within the ELT curriculum, and provide them with tools to investigate learners’ needs, plan courses for ESP and General English classes, and analyze, design and adapt tasks and materials for their students. The course builds on work already done in all the previous courses, especially on task-based instruction and SLA, descriptions of English, curriculum design and pedagogy.

 

Text Books:

Nunan, D. (1988). Syllabus design. Oxford: Oxford University Press

McDonough, J. and Shaw, C. (2003). Material and Methods in ELT (2nd Edition). Oxford: Blackwell.

 

ENG 4204: English for Specific Purposes

Course Description:

This course introduces students to the fundamental aspects related to principles and practice in English for Specific Purposes (ESP). Students will be acquainted with the basic characteristics and theoretical concepts in ESP. They will also be exposed to major developments in the field of ESP research and practice. Participants will also be introduced to the concept of Target Situation Analysis (TSA) of target communities. In addition, they will be given practice in designing an ESP syllabus specific to particular groups of learners.

 

Text Book:

Biber, D., & Conrad, S. (2009). Register, genre, and style. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Harding, Keith. (2007). English for specific purposes. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Richards, J. C. (2001). Curriculum development in language teaching. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

 

ENG 4206: Teaching Reading

Course Description:

The course mainly provides an introduction to aspects of teaching reading and to understand the teaching and learning process better. Focus will be on a number of aspects: major theories of language learning, recent advances in educational psychology and individual differences in learning both in children and adults. In addition, this course will also place some emphasis on perspectives on additional learning processes, products and outcomes in a variety of contexts from around the world. The Program prepares participants to begin teaching reading English in home and abroad.

 

Text Book:

Nation, S.P. (2009). Teaching ESL/EFL Reading and Writing. Routledge: Taylor & Francis.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Lems, K., Miller, L. D. and Soro, T.M. (2010). Teaching Reading to English Language Learners. The Guilford Press: New York London.

 

ENG 4207: Teaching Writing

Course Description:

The course is designed to teach the prospective language teacher how to teach writing skill to the EFL students in Bangladesh. Students will also learn to teach the process of writing. This course will help students learn how to teach the students to think more clearly, organize thoughts in logical sequence, and improve writing skills through prewriting, writing, and rewriting processes. The underlying premise of the course is that the students who take it are inexperienced prospective language teachers who need practice theoretical and practical knowledge to be effective teachers.

 

Text Book:

Nation, S.P. (2009). Teaching ESL/EFL Reading and Writing. Routledge: Taylor & Francis.

Weigle, S.C. (2009). Assessing Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hyland, K. (2003). Second Language Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Williams, J.D. (2003). Preparing to Teach Writing: Research, Theory, and Practice. Lawrence Earlbaum Associates: London.

Ferris, D.R. & Hedgcock, J.S. (2005). Teaching ESL Composition: Purpose, Process, and Practice. Lawrence Earlbaum Associates: London.

Handouts given in the class.

 

ENG 4208: Teaching Listening and Speaking

Course Description:

The course mainly provides an introduction to aspects of teaching speaking, pronunciation and listening and to understand the teaching and learning process better. Focus will be mostly on the micro skills of Listening (for example- retain chunks of language in short-term memory, process speech containing pauses, errors, corrections, and other performance variables etc.), Speaking & pronunciations (produce chunks of language of different lengths, Produce English stress patterns etc.). Also, the program prepares participants to begin teaching speaking and listening English in home and abroad.

 

Text Book:

Roberts, R., Claire, A. and Wilson, J. J. (2011). New Total English. Longman.

Reference Book/ Materials:

Kelly, G. (2001). How to Teach Pronunciation. Pearson Education ESL.

 

TP ENG: Teaching Practicum

Course Description:

The aim of Teaching Practicum is to develop classroom teaching skills for teaching language through a supervised teaching in a high school. Students develop a reflective approach to their development as English language teachers through practicum placement, microteaching, and written reflection.

 

Text Book:

Richards, J. C., & Lockhart, C. (1994). Reflective teaching in second language classrooms. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Reference Book/ Materials: Teaching Practicum Handbook